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About Lev Lafayette

Crocodile Logo

Lev Lafayette has an MBA (Technology Management) from the Chifley Business School, where he was on the Dean's List, a Graduate Certificate in Project Management from the same institution, and an honours degree from Murdoch University in Politics, Philosophy and Sociology which is commented upon by the Vice-Chancellor of the time. Many years later he completed a Graduate Certificate in Adult and Tertiary Education at the same institution.

He is a certified PRINCE2 Practioner, and an Adult and Workplace Trainer. Clearly not satisfied with one masters degree, he's started another, this time a Master of Education at the University of Otago. With a interdisciplinary approach, Lev's interests include the political implementation of universal pragmatics, the relationship between communications technology and society, and comparative economic systems. On again and off again, he plods his way through completing a PhD in Social Theory as well.

Professionally however, Lev is an experienced systems administrator, specialising in the Linux operating system and scientific applications, a project manager, systems engineer, and quality management systems coordinator, specifically for ISO 9001 (Quality assurance) and ISO 270001 (Information Technology Security). He also does a lot of training for researchers and technical staff in Linux, High Performance Computing, mathematical programming, Postgresql, and related subjects, with graduates and post-doctoral learners from a variety of organisations including: RMIT, La Trobe University, the University of Melbourne, Deakin University, Swinburne University, Victoria University of Technology, Monash University, the Australian Synchrotron, the Department of Environment and Primary Industries, the University of Sydney, Macquarie University, the University of New South Wales, the University of Western Australia, the Australian Institute of Health Innovation, the Westmead Millennium Institute, the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency, and the Australian Institution of Marine Science.

Previous employment and clients include several years working as a computer systems trainer and database management for the Parliamentary Labor Party in Victoria. Following this he worked for the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Timor Leste (East Timor) managing their computer network and providing training and technical expertise to that Ministry in their first year of self-governance. Dr. Ramos-Horta provided the following comments on his work.

Lev works for the Research Platforms group at the University of Melbourne, and prior to that Victorian Partnership for Advanced Computing, as a systems administrator for Linux clusters. As per those roles, this site is mostly dedicated to issues concerning High Performance Computing, Scientific Computing and Supercomputing. Lev is involved in Linux Users of Victoria, having spent four years as President, two years as Public Officer, two years as Vice-President, a year as Treasurer and is now in his third year as an ordinary committee member. He is has a coordinating role in the annual Multicore World conference and typically take the role of MC.

The crocodile logo was designed by Victoria Jankowski. It was first used on the cover of Neon-komputadór, the first IT training manual for the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in East Timor which was printed and translated by the United Nations Development Programme. The crocodile represents the Timorese people and is the emblem of their land. The integrated circuit represents their independent connectivity to the wider world.

You can also find a political site that Lev subscribes to, The Isocracy Network, a synthesis of several progressive political orientations, and RPG Review which covers his interests in roleplaying and simulation games. As a secular humanist with an interfaith perspective, he manages and contributes to the Lightbringers website. He also has a livejournal, which will probably be quite boring to anyone who doesn't know him personally.

That's enough of me talking about myself in the third person like Cerebus The Aardvark.

Reviving a Downed Compute Node in TORQUE/MOAB

The following describes a procedure for bringing up a compute node in TORQUE that's marked as 'Down'. Whilst the procedure, once known, is relatively simple, investigation to come to this stage required some research and to save others time this document may help.

1. Determine whether the node is really down.

Following an almighty NFS outage quite a number of compute nodes were marked as "down". However the two standard tools, `mdiag -n | grep "Down"` and `pbsnodes -ln` gave significantly different results.

NFS Cluster Woes

A far too venerable cluster (Scientific Linux release 6.2, 2.6.32 kernel, Opteron 6212 processors) with more than 800 user accounts makes use of NFS-v4 to access storage directories. It is a typical architecture, with a management and login node with a number of compute nodes. The directory /usr/local is on the management node and mounted across to the login and compute nodes. User and project directories are distributed two storage arrays appropriately named storage1 and storage2.


[root@edward-m ~]# cat /etc/fstab

Can processes survive after shutdown?

I had a process in a "uninterruptible sleep" state. Trying to kill it is, unsurprisingly, unhelpful. All the literature on the subject will say that it cannot be killed, and they're right. It's called "uninterruptible" for a reason. An uninterruptable process is in a system call that cannot be interrupted by a signal (such as a SIGKILL, SIGTERM etc).

Deleting "Stuck" Compute Jobs

Often on a cluster a user launches a compute job only to discover that they have some need to delete it (e.g., the data file is corrupt, there was an error in their application commands or PBS script). In TORQUE/PBSPro/OpenPBS etc this can be carried out by the standard PBS command, qdel.


[compute-login ~] qdel job_id

Sometimes however that simply doesn't work. An error message like the following is typical: "qdel: Server could not connect to MOM". I think I've seen this around a hundred times in the past few years.

Enduring Problems with HTML Email and Proprietary Attachments

Once upon a time, in a generation past, letters would be received with written text. There was a default form (paper with ink or pencil) and an encoding (in the language of the correspondents). Whilst this may all seem very trivial, it does have a particular importance for the subject at hand in the context of contemporary electronic mail. Can the recipient of your message actually read what you've sent them? Could imagine a situation where people knowingly sent written correspondence in a format that recipient couldn't read? Have you ever received an email attachment that you couldn't open?

A Farewell to VPAC/V3 Alliance

For the past eight years I've worked at the Victorian Partnership for Advanced Computing, also known as V3 Alliance, its trading name after merging with the Victorian eReserch Initiative. Today is my last official day, although I suspect I'll be doing "VPAC things" for a while yet.

Cluster Installations of GF2X,NTL, and HElib

The installation of three associated packages on a Linux cluster for fast arithmetic, a number theory library, and homomorphic encryption provides some interesting challenges.

GF2X

GF2X "is a C/C++ software package containing routines for fast arithmetic in GF(2)[x] (multiplication, squaring, GCD) and searching for irreducible/primitive trinomials".

Download and extract into a sensible place, and change to that directory.


mkdir /usr/local/src/GF2X
cd /usr/local/src/GF2X

Foreward to "Supercomputing with Linux" by Emeritus Professor David Beanland, AO, FTSE, FIEAust

Our era has been defined by the ever-increasing scale and performance of information technology and its impact on many facets of society. Information technology has been made possible by the rapid, and continuing, development of semiconductor technology which enables high speed electronic processing and storage of data. These advances have continued unabated over more than six decades, enabling the realisation of computers with increasing speeds, sophistication and capability to facilitate the solution of complex problems of larger scale, more rapidly and with increased detail.

Reviving a 'stuck' Google Nexus 7 (2012) from Lollipop Issues

There has been a lot of social media and even mainstream media attention to the various problems people are encountering with the Nexus 7 (2012. 2013) tablets especially after upgrading to "lolipop" (5.1).

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